COVID-19 and prostate cancer management — THE “NEW” PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK

They’re looking for someone in the U.S. whose treatment has been impacted or delayed by COVID-19.

Do you live in the USA and believe that your prostate cancer care may have been seriously affected by the COVID-19 pandemic?

via COVID-19 and prostate cancer management — THE “NEW” PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK

Month 116 – Cancer Treatment Decisions

One of my regular readers of this blog and I have amazingly similar stories when it comes to our diagnosis and treatment. We were both diagnosed around the same age, our PSA levels were quite close to each other, and we both opted for surgery. Both of us had undetectable PSAs well after the surgery—until we didn’t. His PSA became detectable around the three year point, and mine became detectable at a few months shy of five years.

He opted to begin salvage radiation therapy (SRT) along with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) when his PSA hit 0.08 ng/ml. And, if you’ve been following my blog for any amount of time, you already know that I’ve been punting that decision after nearly every PSA test, with my PSA bouncing around in the 0.14-0.16 ng/ml range without seeking SRT or ADT yet.

Who made the right decision?

Both of us.

When cancer is initially introduced into your vocabulary—and even long after—you’ll be faced with a myriad of decisions to make. Is treatment warranted, or can I go on active surveillance? If treatment is needed, do I opt for surgery, radiation, or one of the newer methods available? Which doctor has the most experience? Which hospital has the right equipment? The list goes on and on.

Many of those same questions are applicable in the case of recurrence, too.

When it comes time to make some of those decisions, remember first and foremost that it’s your body, your family, and your circumstances. You—and not anyone else—have the final say.

Do your research using reliable, trusted sources and don’t be afraid to ask the doctor questions or call them out on something you’re not comfortable with. Seek multiple opinions from the doctors that could provide the different treatment options to you (keeping in mind, of course, that some may push their own specialty over others).

Talk to other patients or read their silly blogs to see what their experience has been, knowing that each individual cancer case is unique and will not apply directly to your own situation.

Don’t let the words “prostate cancer” scare you into acting immediately. Unless your Gleason score is an 8 or 9, you do have a bit of time to do this research and consulting with different specialists. I made my decision to have surgery rather quickly and never consulted with a radiation oncologist to see if that would be a viable first treatment option for me. Do I regret that? No. But, with a Gleason 6, I should have slowed things down and have had the meeting anyway.

One of the options that is often overlooked is to do nothing. Okay, it’s not exactly doing nothing—you’ll definitely want to be on active surveillance—but you don’t have to leap right into a treatment option if your cancer is  low grade / not aggressive. My sense is that more and more doctors are beginning to embrace that approach to avoid over-treatment.

That brings me to my final point. Once you make a decision, don’t look back. Embrace it and move forward. If you’ve done your homework correctly, you’ll know in advance what the consequences of that decision may be, and you’ll be more accepting of them if and when they do come.

If my PSA continues to slowly increase and, at some point my body scan lights up like a Christmas tree because I haven’t started SRT, I’ll probably curse like the sailor I once was and say, “I knew this was a possibility. What’s next?” But I’ll also know that I will have had six or seven or more years of high quality of life without any short or long-term side effects from SRT and/or ADT, and that is of great importance to me. As much science as there is in the treatment of prostate cancer, in the end, it’s an educated crap shoot.

Who made the correct decision?

Both of us. One of us. Neither of us.

Time will tell.

Stay Well! Wear A Mask! Wash Your Hands! Stay Home!

Month 114 – Detectable PSA After Surgery-Treat or Watch?

Well, I missed last month’s post and this month’s is late. You would think that with all the quarantine time on my hands, I would have been a writing fool. Not so.

I did come across this study a while back that talks about PSA coming back after surgery and whether it’s wise to treat or watch.

Low Detectable Prostate Specific Antigen after Radical Prostatectomy—Treat or Watch?

My interpretation of the paper with my specific numbers kind of reinforces what the doctor told me at my last visit: that I’m okay continuing to watch my PSA for now. Others with different numbers may come to a different conclusion. We’re all unique, after all.

I’m scheduled for my next follow-up with the doctor the first week of July, so I’ll have to get my blood drawn for the PSA test in late June, assuming the COVID restrictions are lifted by then.


You may recall my last post where I talked about taking medication to lessen the nerve pain in my leg. I started the medication on 30 March 2020 and I seemed to hit the side effects jackpot. They knocked me for a loop, at least initially (hence, no writing).

Headaches, dry mouth, nausea, diarrhea, and extreme fatigue plagued me the first two weeks, but the good news was that the nerve pain was reduced a good 50% to 70%. The side effects were so troubling in the first few weeks that, by the middle of the third week, I cut the dose in half, but the nerve pain returned.

I’m back on the full dose now, and my body seems to have adapted to a degree. The fatigue is still present, the dry mouth is still there, and the nausea is very mild and only early in the morning. (No, I’m not pregnant.) The pendulum swung in the complete opposite direction on my GI system–constipation is now the norm. Sorry. I’m oversharing once again.

We did discuss physical therapy as part of my treatment plan, but that was just as COVID was rearing its head, so that’s been put on hold for now.


I had been fortunate enough to be able to work from home since 16 March because of COVID-19, but I’ve returned to work in the office at the hospital beginning last week.

On the whole, I’m pretty comfortable being in the office again. Sure, there’s a more risk than just sitting at home, but my office is well away from a high-traffic area of the hospital and I’m literally the only person here. I don’t have to go into any of the wards, and the walk from my office to the exit is relatively short. I probably feel more at risk in the grocery store.

California was one of the first states to impose a stay-at-home order and we’re being very cautious and deliberate in our re-opening. Some will say that we’re being too slow, but not me. Our efforts really did make an impact on controlling the virus. We’ve got nearly 40 million people in the state and we have just over 80,000 positive cases and 3,240 deaths. Contrast that with New York state with 19.5 million residents with over 351,000 positive cases and 28,339 deaths.

No matter how you slice it, though, it’s universally tragic. We’re all anxious to get this under control and behind us.

Stay well!

Month 93 – Questioning Recommendation

Regular readers of my blog know that I tend to overthink things. Big time.

I’ve had a few days to think about what the radiation oncologist said in his email—about continued monitoring being a very reasonable approach—and I began to question that bit of advice. Not necessarily its validity, but more along the lines of why the change of heart with the doctor?

When we had our consult in May, there was no doubt that his recommendation was to start salvage radiation therapy right away. He presented a pretty strong argument that early treatment is better than delaying. My numbers now are the same as when he gave his “treat now” recommendation, so why the sudden change to “okay to monitor”? Is he just appeasing me, telling me what he thinks I want to hear? Or does this one data point of a stable PSA really justify changing a treatment recommendation?

Don’t fret. As I said, I overthink things.

I’m perfectly content with the “continue to monitor” approach for the foreseeable future. I really don’t question the integrity of the radiation oncologist either. Even if he was appeasing me, part of being a good doctor is listening to the patient’s concerns and understanding that the patient’s perspective needs to be at forefront of any treatment decision. I only met with the doctor once, but given his take-charge personality, I’m confident that he would have argued more forcefully if he truly thought I needed radiation therapy right away.

I’ve put aside my little bout of cynicism and will focus on enjoying the next four months.

Speaking of four months, that’s the other little cloud that rained on my post-PSA parade. “Crap. I’m back in PSA limbo land yet again.” Mentally, I had prepared myself for the PSA to have gone up again and that I would be one step closer to making the zap or not to zap decision. It’s still emotionally draining even after almost eight years of dealing with this. Oh well. Suck it up, buttercup.


On a fun note, I was toying with the idea of driving out to the 96° F / 36° C desert tonight to try and capture the Perseid meteor shower with my camera (I’m writing this on Friday night). But after three hours in the dentist’s chair this afternoon, that ain’t gonna happen. I’m zonked. Perhaps Saturday night.

Here’s what I captured after an hour and a half of standing alone in the desert last year. A near-full moon was rising and illuminating the mountains, but it was beginning to be too bright to see meteors.

Perseid in ABDSP

 

 

Day 2,663 – Research Induced Stress

Finally! I’m so glad this past week is over. It was emotionally one of the roughest weeks I’ve had in a long time.

It all started last weekend, which was a three day holiday weekend for those of us here in the U.S. Because I want to be as prepared as possible going into my April appointment with my doctor, I spent two of the three days continuing to research all sorts of things that will help me have a better informed discussion.

I posted a question in an online support group under the heading, “Recurrent Prostate Cancer and Salvage Radiation Therapy.” What followed were some very thoughtful sharing of stories from other patients who had been down that path already. But there was also a very robust discussion between a retired physician, himself a prostate cancer patient, and a long-time prostate cancer patient advocate. Both had some great insights—sometimes conflicting—and both connected me to other resources.

I’ll spare the full-blown details, but what stressed me out last weekend—and lasted well into the week—was the notion that, despite the plethora of information out there about recurrent prostate cancer and treatment options, too much of it is conflicting or inconclusive, and there’s no clear answer for me.

When you know that you’re going to have to make a decision that could impact the length of your life and the quality of your time remaining, not having clear choices is a problem. And once you choose your path, there may be no going back. You may have to live with permanent, life-altering side effects as a result of that choice. The risks may be low, but they’re real.

Cancer, treatment options, side effects, and imaging technologies were pretty much all that I thought about all week long, and it took its toll emotionally and physically. I couldn’t shake the thoughts from my head, no matter how hard I tried. In my role as a volunteer manager, I really needed to be as upbeat and positive as I can. I tried my best last week, but it was exhausting doing so.

I know that much of this stress is self-inflicted. If I’d just step away from Google and stop researching, then this may not be so bad. But that’s not how I’m wired. I will say, however, if my doctor’s appointment was tomorrow, I’d feel pretty comfortable going into it with the knowledge that I’ve amassed so far.

I also know that there are no guarantees no matter which path I choose. I just want to choose wisely.

 

Article: Radical revision of treatment for prostate cancer could extend life

Here is a very interesting and perhaps controversial article about shifting how we approach the treatment of prostate cancer:

Radical revision of treatment for prostate cancer could extend life