Month 138 – So Far, So Good (?)

It’s been just over a week since I’ve been injected with my Death to Testosterone juice, a.k.a., Eligard, and things seem to be going okay so far.

The injection site was through being sore within a matter of hours after the injection, so that was a positive thing. (My arm was sore from my second COVID booster for about 48 hours after that injection.)

About the only real side effect from the Eligard that has kicked in is a bit of tiredness or fatigue. It’s as though I’m firing on seven out of eight cylinders right most of the time. Nothing that is debilitating, but it is noticeable. No hot flashes or wild mood swings yet.

I did email the radiation oncologist to let him know that I did, in fact, get the injection, and his response kind of hinted at the fact that it may take a few weeks for the Eligard side effects to really kick in. Time will tell.


As a diversion to all of this, I spent the afternoon watching the my hometown Chicago Cubs take on my adopted hometown San Diego Padres at beautiful Petco Park. I can’t say that I’m a huge baseball fan, so this is a once-every-few-years thing that I do when the Cubbies come to town. One day, I’ll make it to Wrigley Field for the first time ever (blasphemy that I haven’t been, I know).

I’ve got a few other fun things lined up between now and the start of the Zap Fest in late June and hopefully the Eligard side effects don’t kick in and ruin those plans.

A few photos from the game today.

Be well!

You may want to turn down the volume before playing. The pre-game music was a bit loud.

Day 4,192 – Eligard Injection

This morning was not fun at all.

I checked in at 7:30 a.m. for my 8 a.m. appointment and was a bit nervous but doing generally okay. But around 8:05 a.m., the nurse came out and said, “I know you’re here for some medication, but the doctor forgot to enter the order for it to be administered into your record. We’re trying to track her down now and we’re not sure how long it will take.”

Needless to say, I was not a happy camper.

About 8:45 a.m., the nurse came back out to the waiting area for another patient, and I interrupted and asked him the status of tracking down the doctor. “Oh. We haven’t found her yet. We’re trying to contact any doctor but most don’t come in until after 9 a.m.”

Still not a happy camper.

As you all know, I’ve anguished over the decision to move forward with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for a while now. Once you make that decision, you want to move forward with it and psychologically prepare yourself for the event. When you’re given an extra hour and a half, your mind begins to race and to question whether to move forward with this essentially irreversible procedure. At least that’s what my mind did. Call me silly.

The injection itself went well. In fact, it was not much worse than getting my second COVID booster shot last week (or any vaccination). It’s been about three hours since the injection, and the injection site isn’t even sore. It was pretty much a non-event. Time will tell what other side effects will kick in, and how severe they may be.

Well, the stress from this morning has worn me out. Time for a little nap.

More to come, I’m sure.

Be well!

Day 4,153 – Radiation Oncology Appointment

The radiation oncologist threw a curveball that I wasn’t expecting at this morning’s appointment.

In a nutshell, he suggested doing concurrent androgen deprivation (hormone) therapy with the salvage radiation. That was not something that we discussed at our first meeting. The ADT would be for six months if done concurrently.

Doing ADT concurrently would give an estimated 10% benefit to the radiation and longer-term PSA reduction according to the doctor. But he also said that my case would also justify doing the salvage radiation alone and holding off on any hormone therapy until after the radiation is completed. He could argue for either option, but was leaning to the more aggressive concurrent therapies.

I asked about the ADT now lessening its effectiveness later when it’s needed most, and he said that six months of ADT would not really make the cancer hormone resistant.

We didn’t do the body mapping this morning based on this little twist, and that’s okay.

He offered to let me contemplate this over the weekend, and he’ll call me Monday morning to answer any further questions and see which option I would prefer.

I have to admit that the acceleration in my PSA increases is making me lean toward the more aggressive concurrent therapy.

If I choose the straight radiation, I’d go back to UCSD and get mapped and begin the actual zapping a few weeks later. If I choose the concurrent therapy, I’d have to go back to the VA San Diego for the shot and then wait up to two months (I have to confirm, I wasn’t in the note-taking mode) before starting the actual radiation back at UCSD.


Whichever option I decide, I learned this morning that I’m going to have to practice the art of bladder filling.

I was told for the mapping session that I should come in with a full bladder, so I started drinking water about an hour before the 8:30 a.m. appointment: about half a liter at 7:30 a.m. and another half a liter around 8 a.m., plus sipping on water in the waiting area.

By the time the nurse called me back to the exam room around 8:45 a.m., my bladder was about to burst and I had to run to the toilet. “Try to keep some of it in you,” she blurted as I scurried out the door. Yeah, right. By the time I was leaving after seeing the doctor (about 9:15 a.m.), I had to make another mad dash to the toilet. This has the potential to be pretty tricky.


On a somewhat related note, I needed a bit of escapism in advance of the appointment, and I noticed that the weather in Tucson, Arizona was going to be around 74° F / 23° C the first half of this week. I wanted to head over to spend some time in Saguaro National Park and Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. It was a hectic trip, but I had fun and it definitely diverted my attention away from all of this.

If you’re interested, you can check out my report and photos here:

Saguaro National Park and Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

Timing of initiation of ADT for men with biochemical progression after first-line surgery — THE “NEW” PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK

An interesting study concerning the timing of Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT).

For many years your sitemaster has been advising patients that overly early use of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in many men with progressive prostate cancer is not necessarily the best decision (for a number of possible reasons). The benefits of such early ADT — in terms of metastasis-free survival (MFS) and/or overall survival (OS) — […]

Timing of initiation of ADT for men with biochemical progression after first-line surgery — THE “NEW” PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK